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News and Events

Upcoming Events

Touchstone aims to list all Shakespeare-related activity in the UK. Please contact us at touchstone@bham.ac.uk or 0121 414 9525 if you have information that should be listed.

 

January 2016

12 January. Shakespeare, Collaboration, and Dramatic Authorship: The Case of Sir Thomas More. Will Sharpe. This talk will consider Shakespeare as both a collaborative and non-collaborative author, and will describe the vexed case of the manuscript play Sir Thomas More, exploring the forensic linguistic examinations that have been directed at the scene written by “Hand D” (believed to be Shakespeare), and the dramatic quality of the writing. Shakespeare Club, Mason Croft, Stratford-upon-Avon, 7.45pm. £3 visitors. Members and students free. (www.stratfordshakespeareclub.org)

 

13 - 15 January. Winter School. Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. During your stay you will have the chance to listen to conversations between leading Shakespearians, recall performances that you enjoyed in 2015, and learn about some of the projects that will mark the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. Includes tickets to performances of Queen Anne and Love for Love. Tickets: £135 per person. Theatre tickets: £30 each. Information: 01789 207131 or email learning@shakespeare.org.uk

16 January. Royal Shakespeare Company King & Country: Talk Series. Frobisher Auditorium 1. Join the Royal Shakespeare Company for a series of talks where we focus in on Shakespeare’s portrayals of Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V and their individual approaches to leadership. Current cast are joined by actors who have played the roles in other notable productions, to discuss their personal views on the characters. 11:00. Tickets: £8 plus booking fee* (60p online booking fee, 70p telephone booking fee per transaction). www.kingandcountry.org.uk

17 January RSC Shakespeare on Screen: Othello. Cinema 2. Produced for BBC Television’s Theatre Night strand, this is a powerful version of Trevor Nunn’s 1989 intimate production, originally seen at The Other Place. The production features Ian McKellen, Willard White, Imogen Stubbs and Zoe Wanamaker. The setting suggests the American Civil War and, rare for modern productions, the text is played almost in full. Nunn directed the screen version himself, favouring the performances over any strong sense of visual style. Introduction by Sir Willard White. 3pm. Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. http://www.shakespeare400.org/

19 January. Screening Sarah Bernhardt: Reinterpreting Acting on Silent Film. Presented by Dr. Victoria Duckett. Sarah Bernhardt, the great nineteenth-century theatrical actress, was also the first major international film star. Appearing cross-dressed in a short Hamlet film before international audiences at the Paris Exposition of 1900, this 56-year-old French actress most famously went on to make Camille (La Dame aux Camélias, 1911) and Queen Elizabeth (Les Amours de la Reine Elisabeth, 1912). Later appearing in one of the first celebrity home movies (Sarah Bernhardt at Home, 1915), she also made a WWI propaganda film, Mothers of France (Mères Françaises, 1917). This presentation explores these films as evidence of a productive exchange between the stage and the nascent film industry. Rather than see Bernhardt’s acting as evidence of the theatre’s incommensurability with film, it will demonstrate the legacy of her stage acting as she adapted it to early film. The talk will include screenings of the films accompanied by live music. The Swedenborg Hall at 7.30pm. Free event.

19 January. RSC Shakespeare on Screen: As You Like It. Cinema 1. One of the earliest hits for the newly established RSC, Michael Elliott’s sparkling version of Shakespeare's comedy is still remembered with joy by a generation of theatre-goers. The design was dominated by a huge oak tree, but the production is most memorable for Vanessa Redgrave’s luminous Rosalind, supported by Max Adrian and Ian Bannen. Fortunately, the BBC made a studio recording, which here receives an exceptionally rare screening. Introduction by Vanessa Redgrave and John Wyver. 6pm.Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. http://www.shakespeare400.org/

19 January. Pre show talk: Cymbeline. Professor Clare McManus (Roehampton). Globe Theatre, London. Tickets: £7. Bookings: 020 7401 9919 or http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/pre-post-show/introductory-lectures

19 January. Short course: King Lear at the National Theatre. This three-week course explores the four NT productions of King Lear. Participants will explore how different directors have interpreted Shakespeare’s text and brought it to life on stage, using video footage, prompt books, production images and other resources from the NT Archive. Tim Hoare, Assistant Director on the NT’s most recent King Lear, leads this course, sharing his unique insight from the rehearsal room. Week 1: Screening of King Lear (Director Sam Mendes, Olivier, 2014, captured by NT Live). Clore Learning Centre: Cottesloe Room. 2 – 5.30pm. Free, booking required. http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover/learning-events/short-course-king-lear-at-the-national-theatre

20 January. Post Show Talks: Wendy & Peter Pan - An informal way of finding out more about the production, the actor's process and what it's like to work for the RSC. Talkbacks take place onstage in the theatre auditorium after the performance, and are free. Royal Shakespeare Theatre.

23 January. Oxford-Globe Forum. The Oxford-Globe Forum meets twice a year, alternating between Shakespeare’s Globe and the University of Oxford. It brings together researchers and practitioners in medicine, theatre and academia to explore a designated theme. The theme for January 2016 is Mortality. 10.00am – 4.30pm. Nancy Knowles Lecture Theatre, Shakespeare's Globe. Tickets: £15 (includes a discount voucher for lunch). . Bookings: 020 7401 9919 or http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/symposia-conferences/oxford-globe-forum

23 January.. RSC Shakespeare on Screen: King Lear. Cinema 1. Peter Brook’s vision of the tragedy was filmed in black-and white against the snow-covered landscapes of Denmark’s North Jutland. The film was developed from Brook’s RSC staging in 1962, which Peter Holland has described as portraying 'a pitiless universe of despairing nihilism that owed much to Samuel Beckett.'  Scofield’s central performance is simply magnificent. 3pm. Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. http://www.shakespeare400.org/

24 January.. RSC Shakespeare on Screen: A Midsummer Night's Dream. Cinema 2. A richly visual imagining of the play, shot in stylised settings and vivid colours, and presented as if dreamt by a young boy. Based on Adrian Noble’s 1994 staging, this is a triumph of lush design (by Anthony Ward) and immaculate performances. 3pm. Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. http://www.shakespeare400.org/

26 January.  Short course: King Lear at the National Theatre. Week 2: Presentation and discussion on Sam Mendes’ King Lear. Clore Learning Centre: Cottesloe Room. 2 – 4.30pm. Free, booking required. http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover/learning-events/short-course-king-lear-at-the-national-theatre

31 January. RSC Shakespeare on Screen: Hamlet. Cinema 1. Filmed on location in an abandoned seminary in north London, this striking television film captures the essence of Gregory Doran’s 2008 modern-dress staging. David Tennant’s quicksilver characterisation is central to a reading that imagines Elsinore as a world of surveillance and spying. Other standouts in the distinguished case include Patrick Stewart (Claudius), Penny Downie (Gertrude), Mariah Gale (Ophelia) and Oliver Ford Davies as an incomparable Polonius. 2pm. Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. http://www.shakespeare400.org/

February 2016

 

2 February.  Week 3: Exploration of previous NT productions of King Lear. Clore Learning Centre: Cottesloe Room. 2 – 4.30pm. Free, booking required. http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover/learning-events/short-course-king-lear-at-the-national-theatre

2 February. Pre show talk: The Winter's Tale. Dr. Farah Karim-Cooper (Shakespeare's Globe). Globe Theatre, London. Tickets: £7. Bookings: 020 7401 9919 or http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/pre-post-show/introductory-lectures

 

3 February.  Adapting Othello. Royal Festival Hall, London. Dvořák was by no means singular in his artistic attraction to Shakespeare. Othello alone became a virtual obsession in the nineteenth century, and it’s central song The Willow Song - sung by Desdemona as she laments Othello’s inexplicable change of mood - is one of the most well-known and studied songs of the Shakespeare canon. Join Professor Russ McDonald, Goldsmiths, and Professor Clare McManus, University of Roehampton, as they reflect on Othello’s popularity with adaptors and composers, and its role as a lightning rod for perceptions of ethnicity, religion and gender. 6:00pm. Free pre-concert event.

 

5 February. In Context: Tom Stoppard. Prolific playwright Tom Stoppard’s career spans over 50 years. His catalogue of work has entertained and stimulated audiences, from his acclaimed professional breakthrough with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead at the National Theatre in 1967, to the success of his screenplay Shakespeare in Love in 1999, and now his latest play, The Hard Problem. In this afternoon we celebrate his extraordinary theatre work at the National Theatre and beyond through panel discussion and readings. Chaired by Dan Rebellato, (Head of Drama and Theatre at Royal Holloway, University of London), speakers include Jim Hunter who has written three studies of Stoppard including About Stoppard, actor Simon Russell Beale and theatre director Blanche McIntyre who is directing Arcadia for English Touring Theatre in 2015. There will also be an opportunity to put questions to Tom Stoppard himself. Clore Learning Centre: Cottesloe Room, 2 – 5pm. £20 (£15 concessions). Box Office: 020 7452 3000

8 February.  In Context: As You Like It. , An in-depth introduction to As You Like It led by Dr. Abigail Rokison. With members of the company. This afternoon will focus on the sources, historical context and early performance history of As You Like It. And explore the language and the choices open to a director. National Theatre, Cottesloe Room, 2pm-5pm. £20 (£15 Concession) South Bank, London, SE1 9PX. (020 7452 3000)

9 February. Shakespeare & Sons – The life and business dealings of John Shakespeare and his sons. Dr David. This talk will put forward an alternative view of the business and life of John Shakespeare leading to a better understanding of William Shakespeare’s motivations and personal life. Shakespeare Club, Mason Croft, Stratford-upon-Avon, 7.45pm. £3 visitors. Members and students free. (www.stratfordshakespeareclub.org)

9 February. Pre show talk: The Winter's Tale. Dr. Farah Karim-Cooper (Shakespeare's Globe). Globe Theatre, London. Tickets: £7. Bookings: 020 7401 9919 or http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/pre-post-show/introductory-lectures

10 February. Director’s Talk : Dr Faustus- A chance to hear the director of the play in conversation, talking about the decisions they have made bringing the play to the stage. Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Swan Theatre, 5.15pm. £5

10 February.. Late Works. Royal Festival Hall, London. An artist’s final works are often perceived as having a special significance, whether created in the later years of a long and fruitful life, or near the end of one cut tragically short. In this free event, a panel of experts – a literary scholar, an art historian and two leading musicologists examine the idea of ‘late style’ and its association with the last works of creative minds both in old age and earlier, including: Sibelius, Beethoven, Titian, de Kooning and of course, William Shakespeare. 6:00pm. Free pre-concert event.

11-14 February. King's Shakespeare Festival Weekend. A weekend Festival celebrating all things Shakespeare, to mark 400 years since Shakespeare’s death. Featuring talks, performances, screenings and much more. Full programme details to follow soon... http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/centres/lsc/index.aspx

12 February. Shakespeare's Windsor. Royal Festival Hall, London. This exhibition gives access to a very special private collection that explores Shakespeare’s relationship with Windsor, and the very specific associations the playwright had with the town, as a principal seat of Royal power. The exhibition, presented by The Royal Collection Trust, explores ways in which Shakespeare has been collected, viewed, adopted, and performed by the monarchy in the 400 years since his death, and will be introduced here by The Royal Librarian, Oliver Urquhart Irvine, before going on to become part of the visitor experience at Windsor Castle. The exhibition includes material rarely made available to the public, from the Royal Library and Royal Archives, accompanied by collection items from other parts of the Royal Collection. 6:00 pm. ​Free pre-concert event.

13 February. RSC Friends events: Q&A with John Wyver. Holy Trinity Parish Centre. John Wyver is the Director of Screen Productions for the RSC and as such has been responsible for its Live Broadcasts which go out to cinemas around the world. Many of you will have taken advantage of this fairly recent phenomenon and it will be most interesting to find out more about the background to these very successful screenings. John is also a research fellow at the University of Westminster, is a BAFTA winner and has produced performance films for television including Macbeth (with Antony Sher and Harriet Walter) and the RSC’s Hamlet with David Tennant in the title role. 10.30am. Booking closes at 10.30am on 11 February. Tickets: £6 Friends/£7 Guests (one per Friend) http://www.rsc.org.uk/support/friends/rsc-friends-events

22 February. Othello: in Performance. A FutureLearn course running over four-weeks in which “you will discover how the performances and interpretations of Othello have evolved from its first performance in 1604 to the present day.” It will begin by looking at the play as a whole then focus on three big issues: the significance of race, the role of women, and tragedy as a form. The course will focus on the RSC’s 2015 production of Othello, examining several scenes from that production. http://theshakespeareblog.com/blog/

23 February. Director’s Talk A Midsummer Night’s Dream ­- A chance to hear the director of the play in conversation, talking about the decisions they have made bringing the play to the stage. Royal Shakespeare Theatre, 5.15pm. £5

 

23 February. Pre show talk:  The Tempest. Professor Andrew Gurr (University of Reading). Globe Theatre, London.  Tickets: £7. Bookings: 020 7401 9919 or www.shakespearesglobe.com/education/events/pre-post-show/introductory-lectures

26 February. The Macbeths. Royal Festival Hall, London. The decade during which Strauss composed his Macbeth overture was one of ferocious and spectacular creativity where Shakespeare’s Scottish play was concerned. In this cross arts exploration, Dr. Lucy Munro of King’s College London will be joined by actors Tom Lincoln (Macbeth) and Eva Feiler (Lady Macbeth) and musicians to explore two landmark productions of Macbeth through visual material, performed extracts and music, including Sarah Bernhardt’s controversially erotic portrayal of Lady Macbeth in 1884, and Ellen Terry’s embodiment of the character in 1888, which Sargent famously captured on canvas. 6:00pm. Free pre-concert event.

27 February. Unwrapped: A Midsummer Night's Dream. Royal Shakespeare Theatre. Join our actors and members of the creative team as they unwrap our plays and demonstrate some of the skills that go into making them. Tickets: £5 (01789 403493) www.rsc.org.uk/events/unwrapped

28 February. LSO Discovery Day: Berlioz & Shakespeare. Jerwood Hall, LSO St Luke's, London. A morning watching Gianandrea Noseda rehearsing Berlioz’s Romeo and Juliet suite with the LSO at the Barbican, followed by an afternoon of chamber music and talks at LSO St Luke’s. 10.00am - 5.30pm. Tickets: £20 (£15 concessions). Afternoon only from 3pm: £14 (no concessions, available from the Box Office on 020 7638 8891 only)

March 2016

 

2 March. Director’s Talk : Don Quixote ­- A chance to hear the director of the play in conversation, talking about the decisions they have made bringing the play to the stage. Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Swan Theatre, 5.15pm. £5

 

3 March. Post Show Talks: A Midsummer Night's Dream - An informal way of finding out more about the production, the actor's process and what it's like to work for the RSC. Talkbacks take place onstage in the theatre auditorium after the performance, and are free. Royal Shakespeare Theatre.

3 March. Lear – An Imperfect Mind: Brearley and Maguire. The psychoanalyst, Mike Brearley, and the academic, Laurie Maguire, discuss Shakespeare’s understanding of the complexities of the human mind, as seen in King Lear. Chaired by Michael Billington. Olivier Theatre, 5.30pm. Tickets £4 (£3 concessions). Box Office: 020 7452 3000.

4 March. RSC Friends events: Q&A with Nicky Cox. Holy Trinity Parish Centre. At the time of going to print, we are eagerly awaiting the new production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream with its teams of ‘Mechanicals’ drawn from amateur groups all over the country. One of these groups from Stratford, the Bear Pit, is being directed by Nicky Cox, herself no stranger to RSC stages. As a member of the Events and Exhibitions department, she has often been seen interviewing members of the company at pre/post show events so we are very pleased that she has agreed to come and give some insight into what promises to be a most innovative production. 4pm. Booking closes at 4pm on 2 March. Tickets: £6 Friends/£7 Guests (one per Friend) http://www.rsc.org.uk/support/friends/rsc-friends-events

5-6 March. Barbican Shakespeare Weekender: Play On. Barbican Centre. We bid you welcome to our Barbican Shakespeare Weekender for two activity-packed days as boisterous and subversive as Shakespearean drama. Filling our spaces with playful experiences, interactive workshops, insightful talks, fun installations and performances with a difference, Play On offers something for everyone. Shakespeare is the starting point but our featured artists and their modern responses to the playwright’s world take centre stage. Drawn from theatre, dance, art and music, they gather here from around the UK. So, drop in or spend the day with us, dipping into a multitude of surprising and offbeat events; even the food will be Shakespeare-inspired. We’re throwing open our doors to celebrate the playwright’s legacy – come, join our good company. 11am – 6pm. Tickets: Most events during our Barbican Weekender are free; details on ticketed events will be announced soon. www.barbican.org.uk/theatre/event-detail.asp?ID=18750

6 March. Shakespeare on the Silent Screen: Hamlet. Cinema 1. A special performance of the new original score by Robin Harris for Sven Garde’s 1920 production of Hamlet, one of the most absorbing and innovative Shakespearean film adaptations of the silent period. Danish diva Asta Nielsen stars in a powerful, alluring performance as the Prince of Denmark. Born a girl but brought up as a boy, she discovers the truth about Claudius and her mother the Queen and seeks to avenge her Father’s death. With live musical accompaniment by Robin Harris and Laura Anstee. 4pm. Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. www.shakespeare400.org/

8 March Peter Kyle: Presidential Evening. As Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust since 2011 and former Chief Executive of Shakespeare’s Globe, Peter Kyle has a wealth of experience in promoting Shakespeare. 400 years after Shakespeare’s death, we hope to find out how Shakespeare’s legacy is kept alive. Shakespeare Club, Mason Croft, Stratford-upon-Avon, 7.45pm. £3 visitors. Members and students free. (www.stratfordshakespeareclub.org)

10 March. The Development of Professional Stage Management. Presented by Dr. Tracy Cattell. Primary evidence from the earliest theatre-based companies in Britain indicates that ever since there have been professional theatres, there has been professional stage management. This lecture will explore the development of professional stage management in this country by considering primary sources that demonstrate its progression since the late sixteenth century, drawing on the earliest surviving prompt copies to reveal how the first theatre-based companies were supported in their performances by an infrastructure that is recognisable today as stage management.  Dr. Tracy Cattell is a professional Deputy Stage Manager whose experience ranges from subsidised repertory and theatre-in-education to opera and daily repertoire, in which genre she continues to practise on a freelance basis. She undertook her doctorate at the University of Warwick and has a particular research interest in the development of cued performance. She lectures on the practical staging of Shakespeare, contemporary and historical stage management practice, and the interpretation of promptbook annotations, and enjoys sharing her research and professional heritage with professionals in training. She is a member of the Theatre History & Historiography Working Group of the Theatre and Performance Research Association, and the Society for Theatre Research’s New Researchers’ Network. 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall. Free event.

 

21 March. Director’s Talk: Hamlet ­- A chance to hear the director of the play in conversation, talking about the decisions they have made bringing the play to the stage. Royal Shakespeare Theatre, 5.15pm. £5

April 2016

1 April – 31 May. Shakespeare on Film. BFI Southbank. The season will explore the inspirational influence of our greatest playwright on filmmakers across the world, featuring films from the silent era, award-winning adaptations and contemporary interpretations of the Bard’s work. www.shakespeare400.org/

2 April. Tour the Thames: Shakespeare’s London. In 2016 London is celebrating 400 years of Shakespeare. Join experts on a boat tour down the Thames, illuminating sites along the river famous for their links to the Bard. 1-4.30pm.Tickets: £38. www.museumoflondon.org.uk/london-wall/whats-on/adult-events/boat-trip/

2 April.. Shakespeare’s London. Archaeological Archive Tour, Museum of London. Bear bones, stage effects and the original box office smash. Delve into the world of Shakespeare and handle artefacts discovered at London’s Elizabethan theatres. 11am – 12.30pm & 1.30-3pm Tickets: £9. www.museumoflondon.org.uk/london-wall/whats-on/adult-events/archaeology-events/

4 April. Post Show Talks: Don Quixote - An informal way of finding out more about the production, the actor's process and what it's like to work for the RSC. Talkbacks take place onstage in the theatre auditorium after the performance, and are free. Swan Theatre.

5 April. The Winter’s Tale – Shakespeare and the Traditions of Indoor Performance. Guildhall Library, London. At the end of The Winter’s Tale (1611), Shakespeare stages a theatrical miracle: a statue comes to life and a wife and mother is restored to her family. This talk, by Dr Sarah Dustagheer, considers the play’s production at the Blackfriars playhouse, a small candlelit indoor hall that Shakespeare’s company used from 1609. And what, if anything, do recent productions of The Winter’s Tale at the Garrick Theatre (directed by Kenneth Branagh) and at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse (directed by Michael Longhurst) reveal about the wonder of this final scene? 14:00. Free event. www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shakespeare-400-the-winters-tale-shakespeare-and-the-traditions-of-indoor-performance-tickets-19781734701

9 April. International Study of New Place with Paul Edmondson and the archaeologists who led the dig from 2010 to 2015. 10.00 - 4.30pm.

10 April. Shakespeare on the Silent Screen: The Merchant of Venice (Der Kaufmann von Venedig). Cinema 1. Shot on location in Venice, Peter Paul Felner’s adaptation of The Merchant of Venice is an expensive and sumptuous rendition starring some of the greatest German actors of the period - Werner Krauss, Henny Porten and Max Schreck.  Featuring a live piano accompaniment by Stephen Horne. 4pm. Tickets: Standard £11.50, Concessions £10.50 Members £9.20, Under 18 £6, Young Barbican £5. www.shakespeare400.org/

12 April.  Shakespeare’s Celebrations. Find out more about this new organisation that is revitalising the annual celebrations that take place in Stratford-upon-Avon. (www.stratfordshakespeareclub.org)

12 April. Shakespeare in Print. Guildhall Library, London. Taking inspiration from the Guildhall Library’s collections, Dr. Peter Ross (Guildhall Library Principal Librarian) will look at the various books printed at the time of Shakespeare’s First Folio, the plays and the playwrights. His talk will include a look at the First Folio itself. 13:00. Free event. www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shakespeare400-shakespeare-in-print-tickets-19781894178

12 April. Lunatics, Lovers and Poets: Stories after Cervantes and Shakespeare. Conference Centre, The British Library, 18.30. To commemorate the 400th anniversary of the near simultaneous deaths of both Shakespeare and Cervantes deaths in 1616, And Other Stories have selected twelve contemporary international writers to write an original and previously unpublished story as their tribute to these giants of world literature. Join a selection of the writers for an evening of readings and discussion. In order to celebrate the international influence of each writer, the six English-speaking writers offer a take on Cervantes and his work, while six contemporary Spanish-language writers have written stories inspired by Shakespeare. The writers are Kamila Shamsie; Ben Okri; Deborah Levy; Yuri Herrera; Marcos Giralt Torrente; Juan Gabriel Vásquez; Vicente Molina Foix; Soledad Puertolas; Hisham Matar; Nell Leyshon; Rhidian Brook and Valeria Luiselli, with an introduction by Salman Rushdie. Full Price: £10.00, Senior 60+: £8.00, Student: £7.00, Registered Unemployed: £7.00, Under 18: £7.00, Friend of the BL: £7.00. www.bl.uk/events/lunatics-lovers-and-poets-stories-after-cervantes-and-shakespeare#sthash.9AabTb9q.dpuf

15 April. . Think you know Romeo and Juliet? Royal Festival Hall, London. How well do you know Romeo and Juliet? Generations of students, obliged to read Romeo and Juliet at school, often in their very early teens, have tended not to think of it as a complicated play – and in many ways it is perfect for our younger years: it is fast-moving, funny, engaging, tragic, sentimental, sexy, and colourful. Yet Romeo and Juliet is also a play that, as you progress through life, repays repeated revisiting. In this illuminating talk, Professor Gordon McMullan, Academic Director of Shakespeare400, will address some of the myths associated with Romeo and Juliet. With help from a group of actors, McMullan will show us how different the play can be – in its attitude to the generations, to violence, to politics, to sex – to that which tradition has led us to believe. 6:00pm. Free event. www.lpo.org.uk/whats-on-and-tickets/4436-free-preconcert-event.html

15 April - 6 September. Shakespeare in Ten acts. PACCAR Gallery, The British Library. It reveals ten performances that have made Shakespeare the cultural icon he is today. It is often said that Shakespeare’s work is universal, but this is to ignore the fact that his plays have been constantly reinvented to suit the times. Across the centuries, Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed and translated, faked and forged, revised, recast and redesigned to appeal to new generations of theatre-goers in Britain and around the world. This exhibition explores the impact of ten significant theatrical moments from Shakespeare’s first production of Hamlet to a digital-age deconstruction for the 21st century. See the only surviving play-script in Shakespeare’s hand, two of only six authentic Shakespeare signatures, and rare printed editions including the First Folio, alongside film, paintings, photographs, costumes and props. Tickets go on sale soon - See more at: www.bl.uk/events/shakespeare-in-ten-acts#sthash.yuGliian.dpuf

 

16 April.  Shakespeare’s London. Archaeological Archive Tour, Museum of London. Bear bones, stage effects and the original box office smash. Delve into the world of Shakespeare and handle artefacts discovered at London’s Elizabethan theatres. 11am – 12.30pm & 1.30-3pm Tickets: £9. www.museumoflondon.org.uk/london-wall/whats-on/adult-events/archaeology-events/

16 April.  Henry James: Shakespeare and Horror. Conference Centre, The British Library. 14.00. £7-10.  https://boxoffice.bl.uk/category_details.php?pgto=cat

18 April.  Worlds elsewhere: Journeys around Shakespeare’s Globe. Conference Centre, The British Library. 18.30-20.30. Full Price: £10.00, Senior 60+: £8.00, Student: £7.00, Registered Unemployed: £7.00, Under 18: £7.00, Friend of the BL: £7.00. In his book World’s Elsewhere, Andrew Dickson takes us on a cultural journey from India to the US, China to South Africa and beyond. Packed with stories and surprises, his account gives a rich taste of the enormous impact Shakespeare has had around the world. He discusses these journeys and is joined by some special international guests. www.bl.uk/events/worlds-elsewhere-journeys-around-shakespeares-globe#sthash.sy19iSHm.dpuf

20 April. Disability and Shakespearean Theatre Symposium. This symposium draws together growing research interest in disability studies and Shakespearean theatre. In discussing the depiction, treatment, and uses of disability in Shakespeare’s work (and that of his contemporaries) alongside analysis of the role of disability in staging of his plays, we hope to encourage interaction between creative practitioners, historians, and literary scholars. Playwright and disability studies scholar Professor. Chris Mounsey (University of Winchester) will give the keynote address on “VariAbility in Shakespeare”, in which he will explore alternative ways of responding to the question of the existence of disability in the Early Modern period, and to one of Shakespeare’s most infamous characters: Richard III. Following the symposium, Glasgow-based playwright Molly Ziegler (Notes, Getting it (Back)) has agreed to premier her new play, Let Her Come In. Let Her Come In is a one act rewriting of Hamlet, focused on mental illness, gender, and disability. Sir Alwyn Williams Building, Lilybank Gardens, University of Glasgow. 9.45am – 5.00pm.  £25 full, £15 concession, free for BSA members. Email: disabilityandshakespeare@gmail.com

22 April. ‘Shakespeare Odes’: a re-staging of Garrick’s 1769 Ode and a new Ode by Carol Ann Duffy (co-commissioned by The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust). Performed by Ex Cathedra choir. 7.30pm, Holy Trinity Church. Tickets: 0121 345 0603 or http://excathedra.co.uk/

22 April. Celebrating Shakespeare. The National Theatre will be marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death with a special day of events, talks and discussions. Further details to follow so please check website for updates: www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover/platforms/celebrating-shakespeare

23 April. The opening of New Place.

28 April. Shakespeare's London/Beaumont's London. Guildhall Library, London. We are used to thinking about Shakespeare in London. This talk, by Dr Lucy Munro, explores alternative views of London through the works of Francis Beaumont who - like Shakespeare - died in 1616 and whose play The Knight of the Burning Pestle is a hilarious parody of different ways of writing about the city. Includes wine reception. 6:00pm. Tickets: £6.47. https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shakespeare400-shakespeares-londonbeaumonts-london-tickets-19799047484

30 April. Unwrapped: Doctor Faustus. Swan Theatre. Join our actors and members of the creative team as they unwrap our plays and demonstrate some of the skills that go into making them. Tickets: £5 (01789 403493) www.rsc.org.uk/events/unwrapped

30 April. Shakespeare and Modernism Symposium. Barbican Centre, The Pit. This one-day symposium explores the relationship between modernist thinking, scenography, art and literature in the early to mid-twentieth century, posing questions about modernism's legacy for Shakespeare production and scholarship today. Taking place within the modernist architectural frame of the Centre, topics discussed include: modernist writers and thinkers’ relationship with Shakespeare and the past; the impact of modernist design on Shakespeare production; the legacy of Shakespeare in modernist and post-modernist culture. 10am to 5pm. Tickets: £15 (includes a complimentary glass of wine at the end of the day). www.barbican.org.uk/theatre/event-detail.asp?ID=18855

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


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